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the people who live here to shop locally, and you see that today. >> welcome to montpelier, vermont. with the help of our comcast partners. for the next hour, we will travel the area in and around this capital city. coming up, visits to programs that this is a community that values writing and reading. >> later to the vermont college of fine arts to see how a city of only 8000 supports three independent bookstores in the writing program. >> when i first moved here, someone tell me you have to be careful about driving around on the back roads because novelists are all over the road like dear. >> and we will talk about the collections in the local authors all of this as comcast and booktv take you to montpelier, vermont. >> probably what we are known for is her squeaky floors for it we have these great wood floors to make a ton of noise and our customers love it. it is a little bit wonderful. we listen to it all day long. we are not a superstore or a slick store. the squeaky floors represent this kind of very old store. you don't get this kind of thing in a lot of communities anymore.
principles of good government" liberty, people in politics. out in august of 2012. vermont became a state in 1791 and became the largest producer of maple syrup in the united states and one of the largest granite producers in the country. the areas also rich in history and literary culture. over the course of our recent visit with the help of our cable partner comcast booktv brings you many interviews of local authors and tours is significant locations. you can watch a few of them now. >> the book is titled "freedom and unity" and the authors are me, michael sherman and steve jeffrey hob lashed. we worked on it together. we thought of it as a conference of history of vermont, comprehensive making a going more than one volume and it starts with the formation of the mountains and it goes -- right before he published in 2004, so it has got a lot of information jammed into it about people, but politics and social movements and intellectual movements, some literature, some of the arts. we try to touch on many of the topics that we thought vermonters might want to know about and what people mig
. we created the vermont date archived records administration to combine public records coaches underneath a different entity than the state archives and combined estate archive divisions editions of the secretary of states office into one. this is the state record center. because vermont is one of the last states to have officially estate archive from the records go back to 1760. one of the collections we want to talk about today is the eugenic survey of vermont records. the survey was in i.t. that came out of a professor from the university of vermont. professor perkins was concerned about problems from out with stacy. one of them after world war ii was apparently a number of vermonters are rejected by the draft based on what they considered to be the facts. one question is why this for months stand so high with so many physical and mental defects? that came from something that came out of the draft. it turned out to be false overtime. but vermonters didn't have quality on that draft. so we organized a project and receive funding to do a survey and professor perkins is very in
in america. in terms of vermont, the largest historic district in the states is a a very historic community. a ton of a thousand, we grow to about 20,000 during the day. that's largely because the jobs that are here, we are a center of commerce in the area. we are very fortunate here in that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occur nationally. .. montpelier really does value the independent nature. our three independent bookstores, we have a very significant out of here about the teen years ago. were the only state capital in the country that doesn't have comments and that was a choice. it's a testament to the community and citizens here. they banded together and made it clear that with not the kind of business we wanted and that would be the outcome. so there's a real sense of independence and a value other people people who've lived here. see that in the way people behave. >> this is a community that values books, values reading. we have a lot of writers. >> when i first moved here, someone told matt that have to be careful driving back grosbeak is to get a novelist.
at the literary culture of montpelier, vermont. we hear from howard coffin about his book, which details several civil war accounts detailed in his new book. >> hello, i am howard coffin, i'm a seventh generation vermonter, and i had a least six ancestors who fought for the vermont regiment in the civil war. i have written three books on vermont and the civil war in the fourth one will be coming out in the spring called it comes from a famous speech by a great hero of the civil war, joshua changer -- joshua chamberlain. he said something abides and remains and you can feel her presence there. i know that vermont is the best place to see the america of the civil war era. and so i thought, i'm going to go to every one of our 251 towns and see what surviving civil war sites i can find. and i found drill fields and hospitals and underground railroad sites, halls were abolitionists spoke and i even found a field where a quaker minister heard a voice from the heavens that predicted the american civil war. these places are everywhere and it took me six years. the book is finally done and will be out in
, house and governors' debates from around the country heading into tomorrow's elections. next to vermont for a senate debate between incumbent independent senator bernie sanders and republican candidate john macgovern. it also includes candidates representing the liberal union, u.s. marijuana and peace and prosperities parties. >> moderator: before we conclude tonight, we want to thank lizzie trillion for joining us tonight as our timekeeper. so without any further ado, let's begin. we'll begin tonight with you, mr. diamondstone. if you had 60 seconds with me in an elevator and had to describe yourself, what would you say? diamondstone: i probably wouldn't say anything, but let me try. um, i'm almost 78 years old, been a candidate a number of times, um, represent a party that stands for peace and individual liberty and social justice, and i'm a member of the socialist party, the american legion, the veterans for peace and liberty union. i'm an officer of liberty unionment um, i live with my spouse of 55 years, i have four children; aaron, jesse, paula, ian, and 15 grandchildren, and they
. it's wonderful to be here. is this everything a bookstore should be. i am happy to be in vermont because i have longstanding family ties with the state. can you hear? talk louder? okay. i have longstanding ties with the state and my book got started here in vermont. when i was a little girl used to spend my vacations with my grandmother who lived in a wonderful white federal style house on main street in windsor vermont which is an hour and a half north from here. i could spend the summers what she called lulling around and imagining what it would be like to live there before i was born. my father had a big family. there were seven children. he had two sisters and four brothers. the most famous of them would be archibald cox. you probably remember was the watergate special prosecutor. but when i was growing up, my father's brother who really fascinated me was the one who was missing from the family. he had been killed in the war which at that time of course was world war ii. my grandmother kept mementos of his around the house. i knew a few things from them. she didn't talk about
at wellesley college. here is vermont. i'm looking at the data, and middlebury case more on average than the university of vermont for every faculty range. you look at the figures for assistant professors, talking about the future talents, you have a situation where there are nine universities in the country where new professors earn six-figure salaries. eight of them are private and the one that is public is a medical institution on its own pay scale. the future here very much favors private on retaining talent. many choose their fields not because they want to get rich, but because there is a calling. it is beyond that. i spoke to a research university president of a public aau institutions here and we are talking about calendar offers that his institution has to make. he said that when he was lucky, he could raise enough money somewhere to match many salaries. but what he could not match with the conditions of the buildings and the ability to reduce the number of graduate students desired and to work with them and he also couldn't match a course reduction, where is a private research
weird details. here's something weirder. vermont. this is vermont governor peter shumlin. he's the favorite to win the most votes in the governor's race. he leads in the polls by more than 30 points. but that may not be enough. the vermont state constitution requires a candidate for governor to get 50% plus one vote. even though governor shumlin is leading by 30 points, he has four opponents. so if those four opponents get a combined 50% of the vote between them, governor shumlin will not be re-elected no matter how big the margin he wins by. in that case with nobody getting 50%, it's the state legislature that would get to pick the next governor of vermont. that could happen. it has happened very recently. some of the most interesting still undecided races from yesterday's elections after the governor's seat. this afternoon nbc news declaring peter shumlin the winner in vermont. vermont's first democratic governor in eight years. what's interesting about that is that even though peter shumlin the democrat won, he did not get 50% of the vote. under vermont's state rules, that
facing off against john mcgovern and other candidates for a seat in vermont. >> for the last four years, the status quo in washington has fought us every step of the way. they have spent millions to stop us from reforming the health care system and reforming wall street. they engineered a strategy of gridlock in congress. refusing to compromise on ideas that democrats and republicans used in the past. but they are counting on now is that you'll be so worn down and discouraged and so tired of all this function, you will just give up and walk away and leave the powers that be in power. >> my conviction that better days are ahead is based on proven results. and on unshakable faith in the american spirit. anyone who fears that the american dream is fading away? if there is anyone who wonders whether better jobs and paychecks are a thing of the past, i have a clear and unequivocal message. with the right leadership, america is about to come running back. >> tuesday night, watch live coverage with president obama and mitt romney. plus victory speeches and concession speeches from across the c
without breaking the back of the budget to bring back to those who needed in vermont. it lets people have more of their money don't you think. the government isn't. they would go without it is an absurdity. >> moderator: ms. ericson? ericson: my grandfather was born in the him perform and it used to be legal and if we legalize it again we could pay for liheap. legalizing and taxing marijuana and hemp won't pay for everything but if it comes between vermont freezing to death in their home and legalizing tax marijuana and pay for the fuel assistance with that. >> moderator: you are watching a live debate at the studio of the vermont public television. the candidates of the united states senate. why don't we move next to health care. we will start with you -- [inaudible] >> moderator: we are going to move to the next topic here. i want to discuss health care and whether or not you support the affordable care act otherwise known as obamacare and we start with you. i support socialize medicine and one of the problems we can't get it because we are tied up in the single-payer issue which is adm
to the uniform in the back bay. right here, sir. >> and add vermont for the national institute of disease at nih. i am a retired medical officer. i was actually recruited because of my military background. because 12 years ago, the director of that division recognized that hiv/aids had to be addressed outside of our country. and no one else, not the cdc, not usaid although they're better today than they were. how is the capacity to the operational aspects necessary internationally except the military. and it's worked out extremely well. just a few years ago, the plot was we would never, ever have an hiv vaccine, but the military pulled out the vaccine trial in thailand donis rv 144, which is change the complexion that one day have a vaccine. no one else could have done that. i tell you my job was to oversee the development for nih. and no one else could do it. not a contractor, not the cdc, not usaid, no one, just the military. as to overseas labs i know best are each a in thailand and they've been around a long time. they were set up after world war ii in early 1950. why have they done so well?
so far, and, yes, the networks have also called vermont for president obama. in a moment, we are going to go to vermont. they have also called the race for governor, and peter there will return it -- retain his governorship, and also, independent senator bernie sanders of vermont has won reelection. a longtime labor, racial justice, an activist and columnist, the founder of the black radical congress, this is going to be a a long evening, bill. what are you looking for tonight, and what have you observed so far? >> well, what i have observed and what worries me are the electoral manipulations that are taking place. i was listening to the tail end of your last guest, and part of what i have been thinking about is that one of the dangers that we face is the continuous erosion of democracy that we have been at with 30 plus years. it seems to be hiding. there is a combination of the citizens united decision plus the desperate move by the republicans to thwart the will of the people, and i find that actually quite -- quite frightening. one of the challenges is that at a certain po
called by abc. indiana and kentucky goes to governor romney and vermont goes to president obama. that's pretty much it. >> election over. good night everybody. >> of course, those were results suspected. nothing surprising there guys. one thing to watch and in a half hour we'll have north carolina closing, and i imagine virginia closed, it will take a while to get as a result from them. as north carolina closes if it takes a while to get information from north carolina, that would mean good thing out of virginia. these are things that you look at at this time of the night and it doesn't mean anything, but if north carolina isn't immediately called, that's good signs for the president. >> cenk: it's election night already. indiana for romney, and cnn is calling kentucky for romney. these are not at all surprising, but i love all calls. i plan to be shouting about them all night long. let me give you some interesting exit polls. again, i talked with governor spitzer about this just a while ago on current. these don't--don't take anything to heart. oh my good i saw an exit poll in hawai'
to be in vermont because i have long-standing family ties with the state and i have ties with the state. my book really got started here in vermont. when i was a little girl, i used to spend my school vacations with my grandmother who lived in a federal style house on main street in windsor, vermont, on the connecticut river. i spent the summers lolling around, reading and imagining what it was like to live there. one was like to live there before i was born. my father had a big family. he had two sisters and four brothers. the most famous of them would be archibald cox, he was a watergate special prosecutor. when i was growing up, my father's brother, who really fascinated me, was the one who is missing from the family. he had been killed, which at that time was world war ii. my grandmother kept mementos of him around the house. she was a little reticent about anything private anyway. she kept a wonderful photograph in her bedroom that showed him with a frames-based like a halo, almost. i knew that he had been athletic, she had a photograph of him in his hockey skates and sweater and he had gon
in indiana in the senate race. we're hearing that vermont, the toesident once again in the green mountain state, the networks are projecting thates barack obama wil win in vermont. >> woodruff: now we'll have complete analysias was watch these calls w and projections ce in. we'll have completena asisna and reaction to the latest returns just ahead on the pbsnd newshou. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> c is a uvers languae. when i w in an accident i wac2 worried the healtcare stem c2e lauall its own witunited health care i gotot helthat fit mlife, c2formion on mphone, coection to ctorwho getet where i'from, tools to eime wh mcare m cost.t. i never miss . >> wee more tn 78,0 peoplec2 looking out for more tn 70 llion ericans. that's health in numbers.ed heak >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporat
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategi and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small teo oratjo corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is a special edition of bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. president obama joins campaign workers to dial up support in the final hours. >> we feel we have the votes to win. >> his rival, mitt romney is off to the polls, and then bet -- back to the campaign trail for one final push. >> we are going to steer this countryonk onon to a course that will help the american people have a brighter future. >> and taking a spin back in time, tonight, we will show you how the competitors have stacked up over the years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere are around the globe. election day is finally here and
. >> the university of vermont hosted a conference looking at the future of public research universities, comparing private universities to public universities, focusing on faculty, funding, and degrees that will lead to jobs. this is 90 minutes. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> welcome back to the program. good morning. scott jaschik. welcome to the concluding day of this symposium on the future of public research universities. before i introduce the panel, just to remind you all, we are filled for c-span so when we get to the questions and answers, it is important to use the microphone. thank you for your interest. i want to introduce the topic and then turn it over to discussion with panelists and get you involved. we are talking right now about research, scholarships and the arts at the great public research universities. in essence, what we are talking about is the faculty, their role, and who the faculty are, including teacher faculty, including graduate students. i would argue we are at a huge challenge in the
are at the historic vermont college of fine artses in montpellier vermont. i'm the founding president of the college. i've always been a story-teller and always loved to read, and i was reading -- i thought maybe shy do this and i went back to school and took a creative writing class and decided i had a knack for it and never turned back. there's nothing more satisfying than working on a novel, particularly when you have a job like running a college. it's almost like -- although my literary life is an important part of what i do in some ways i'm still a tinkerer at night in the garage. i'm no different than someone building model airplanes. eye just crafting a 280 page novel that people hopefully read and enjoy. >>> the building behind is was erected in 1868 and this was a women's undergraduate college for years. in 2006, the campus was in danger of closing. there were established msa programs here, and so i led an effort with he faculty and staff of the college to take the institution independent, form into a fine arts college, chit is today, and in 2008 we became the first new independent college
a sensation sensational relief. senator bernie sanders of vermont will joins but next, the debate of gun control nearly absent during the campaign. that simply has t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ♪ ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. gentlemanit's all over but the time screaming and shouting. two final thoughts. first, amist all the acrimony and fury, let's not forget that some how this process has worked for over 200 years, and the rest of the world has not only watched and marveled, it has imitated and followed. the principles have taken root and even if i am perfectly. the experiment that was doomed to fail 200 years ago is now the model for all. many folks wake up and want to be like us more than any other nation. we're the envy of the world because of the process, flawed as it may often be. we should take pride in there. there were two issues ignored over the campaign. the aurora shooting which so vividly made clear what
. in vermont also as expected, barack obama wins the state of vermont. so, again, these are pretty much in line with what had been expected. the gubernatorial race there, hanging on and will likely be governor. there was that threat to challenge that. maybe split tickets along with of vermont line. that is not happening this year. it is not unusual, for example, to have a republican governor and in the case of lombardi sanders, an independent mayor. burlington and now, of course, an independent senator. he will easily win reelection tonight. that was never much in doubt. bernie sanders, practically a rock star in the state of vermont. still very early. we are in no way, shape, or form able to project averaging is going to go. that is very closely monitored. thirteen electoral votes, a state that had tipped to barack obama four years ago. very close. the poles remain very, very tight. in fact, unbelievably tight. we are not at all comparable saying it will go. in georgia where mitt romney is favored, again, very, very tight . we are not in that position to say the strength that he has in the sub
with more on the fiscal cliff negotiations is senator bernie sanders, independent from vermont. senator, many thanks for your time and congratulations on your genuine landslide victory of 71.3% in the great state of vermont. >> thank you. thank you. >> eliot: so how do we turn the exaltation of last week into results? how do we know say there must be a reformation of what had been offered to the republicans last year? >> well, eliot i tell you the wray to do it is very simple. listen to what the american people want, not what wall street wants not what inside the beltway pundits want but what the american people want. what they want is very clear. they said it in the election and they have said it in poll after poll after poll. and that is number one, at a time when we have incredible income and wealth and equality in this country where the wealthy are doing phenomenally well and their effective tax rates as buffett reminds us are -- the wealthiest people are going to have to start paying their fair share of taxes
with susan clark. he explains the new england culture of town meeting. it's conducted at vermont historical society. >>> the meeting is like the sex act. there's no completion you may try it pretty soon you get bored and go home. the key is there's a decision at there are lots of discussions throughout a town meeting. in which policy changes has nothing to do with recommendation or listening to people for the help it is. it's to governor yourself and reach a decision. you go in to a town meeting and your tax rate is x and it's y with you come out. you raided your taxes and lowered them. you bought a town truck or decided not to or buy one. it sends the message to the rest of the united states. cow can governor locally. nationally it's almost a given that we can can't. you couldn't really do that. in fact indeed you can. we do. i published with susan clark a book about town meeting about the liberation of town meeting, and reforms for town meeting. got all of those in favor, which i thought it was a neat tight. it was susan's idea. she's the force behind it. we're worried that the town meeti
. but that may not be enough. the vermont state constitution requires a candidate for governor to get 50% plus one vote. so even though he's leading, he has four opponents. so if those four opponents get a combined 50% of the vote, the governor will not be reelected no matter how big the margin he wins by. in that case with nobody getting 50%, it's the state legislature that picks the governor. that's happened recently. some of the most interesting still undecided races from yesterday's elections after the governor's seat. this afternoon nbc news declaring peter shumlin the winner. what's interesting about that is that even though the democrat won, he did not get 50% of the vote. under vermont's state rules, that means technically the legislature picks who wins the race. two months after that, the vermont legislature did what vermonters had already done. they picked peter shumlin to be governor. which means 28 people in the legislature voted to elect somebody who the people of vermont did not vote for. a gentle reminder that states run the elections. they are governed by weird rules and worth
. >> the university of vermont hosted a conference last month focusing on the future of public research universities. this next panel compared private universities to public universities focusing on faculty, funding and majors that will lead to jobs. you'll hear from the editor of inside higher ed as well as current and former university officials. from burlington, vermont, this is about 90 minutes. >> welcome back to the program -- oh. sorry about that. good morning. welcome to the concluding day of precipice or crossroads, a symposium on the future of public universities. before i introduce the panel, to remind you all as you may see, we are being filmed for c-span, so when we get to the q&a portion today, it's important to use the microphone, and you'll do were the than i -- you'll do better than i and actually turn it on. i want to introduce the topic that we're going to focus on first this morning and then turn it over to a discussion with our possiblists, and then to get you involved. we're talking right now about research, scholarship and arts at the great public research universities. and in
to be at the northshire. i'm also happy to be in vermont because i have longstanding family ties with the state. am i being -- am i -- can you hear? yeah, talk louder. okay. i have longstanding ties with this state, and my book really got started here in vermont. when i was a little girl, i used to spend my school vacations with my grandmother who live inside a wonderful big, old, white federal-style house on main street in windsor, vermont, which is an hour and a half maybe north of here on the connecticut river. i could spend the summers, what she called lolling around realizing and imagining what it was like to the live there before i was born. my father had a big family, there were seven children. he had two sisters and four brothers. the most famous of them would be archie bald cox, but my father's brother who really fascinated me was the one who was missing from the family. he'd been killed in the war, which at that time, of course, was world war ii. my grandmother kept momentos of his around the house. i knew a few things from them. she didn't talk about him much. she was kind of reticent abou
's part of going to the university of vermont, and you don't want to lose that. >> let's go to the questions. >> this is fascinating, i'm a little worried about changing the subject, but that's what i'm goinged to do. i want to thank everybody. it's been a real pleasure being here. i worked with a number of people. i'm lucy, worked for a research firm that serves higher education, and many of the people here have. our clients or candidates and searches in the past, and i'm struck after the last two days of listening to all of the change that's taking place in higher education and if we were to accept peter's suggestion thatñhr managing change is a sht term job, listen to the characterizations, risky, if not dangerous, and they said you can only watch so many people go in the middle of the road and stand there and get hit by the same bus over and over and over again and realize i'm not going to do that so i'm grateful that dan said there's joy in the jobs, and there's a reason to do it, certainly within the public land grant mission. it's a very, very compelling mission. let
month the university of vermont hosted a conference focusing on the future of public research universities. the organizers kicked things off by comparing private universities to public universities, including faculty of funding, and the ability to availability of major's that lead to jobs. this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> welcome back. sorry about that. morning. welcome. the concluding day of precipices or crossroads symposium on the future of public research universities. before i introduced the panel, just to remind you all, as you may see, we are being filmed for a c-span. will we get to the q&a portion today it is important to use the microphone. you will do better than i. so thank you for your interest. i want to introduce the topic that we are going to focus on first this morning and then turn it over to a discussion with our panelists. then to get you involved. we are talking right now about research, scholarships, and the arts. the great public research university. and, in essence, what we're talking about, i think, is the faculty. and the faculty role and to the f
we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a primary source of jobs. our insurance companies do well. we have three large insurance companies headquartered here. we are relatively protected from the ebbs and flows of the national economy. we are a tourism based community. we have not seen much of a dip and that. our downtown buildings are almost all full. a real testament to the strength of our downtown and the attraction for people that want to visit here. we ha
of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> china debates over what to leaders will guide the country through the next decade. they will be unveiled in a few days but delegates of the chinese communist party congress admit they have no clear idea of who they think it will be. >> with the world's attention focused on the very top of the chinese leadership meeting here in beijing, we will be asking what life is like at the bottom. meeting card-carrying members of the communist party. >> welcome to "gmt." also on the program -- syrian were plans bomb a rebel-held town on the turkish border, killing six. floods in venice -- heavy rain and wind it wreak havoc in north and central italy. midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington and 8:00 in the eve
of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> and american voters return to morocco, to the white house, and he promises three did to the white house, -- american voters returned barack obama to the white house. >> dino for the united states of america the best is yet to come. >> it is more of a hangover than a honeymoon. financial markets fall a day after the election. china gets ready to take a new generation. the u.s. voters have spoken, and after a hard-fought campaign, they have reelected barack obama. right now the president and his family have returned to the white house, where they will be residents for the next four years. right now it is about watching e votes come in. mr. obama has won 303 alike toro college of v
." >> funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> it has been a truly momentous week. first, the u.s. election. the confirmation the chinese elite will steer china through the next decade. >> china will develop its own type of democracy, whether the west except it or not. >> we speak to henry kissinger in his first television interview since president obama was reelected. >> i think that both obama and xi jinping will have to acts themselves how they expect the relationship to of golf. >> with social media websites going in and out of fashion, we asked the founder of tumblr makes this different. >> it is a delightful surprise when you bumped to a stranger who cares about
by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television i
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise in a tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news america. >> this is bbc world news america. aseral patras' steps down the cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >>
has already called a from you races, they giffinin and kentucky to mitt romney and vermont to president obama no. surprises there. they're also giving vermont to the incumbent senate bernie sanders and again, it was expected. we will have more after this. did you know that getting up and getting active for just 60 minutes a day is all it takes to help you get stronger, look better, and feel great? or that fresh fruits and veggies aren't just healthier and crunchier, they can taste better, too? eating better and getting more active is easier than you think. (all) yeah! keep watching for some fun and easy ways to discover the magic of healthy living in your life. america... (all) let's get healthy together! (cheering) ♪ >>> we have been telling you all day about the long lines at some polling sites and get this, we're hearing a polling spot in woodbridge, virginia, the line is so long folks could be waiting three hours just to cast their ballots. that location is potomac middle school. we have a news crew there to scoop the whole thing out. as we had mention, polls official
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